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BLUE CHAIR SALON Group

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Anthony Wells
Anthony Wells

The Movie Book Toofan


LINK ->->->-> https://urlin.us/2tsgS0





Training the body is way harder! Regarding the Tapori slang, I mean you have Vijay Maurya doing the dialogues, and he has great wit, understanding, and nuance. So, we had that to work off. And just to jam was the fun part. When you sit around with other actors and you are reading your lines and just having fun. Working with Hussain was absolutely incredible. He helped me and my performance tremendously in those scenes, especially when we are like the catch whiskers guys roaming around the streets of Dongri. Then, of course, working with Mrunal (Thakur) was, I mean she is four films old, but you cannot tell that when you see this movie. She is so good. Then the absolutely incredible and talented Paresh Rawal Ji. It was a dream to have him on board for a film like this.


Useless and most predictable movie. No need to watch... Big joke so far that critics providing a rating of 3.5. Movie is full of useless drama. At every scene you can predict the story line except heroin got expire in-between (no need of this in the movie)Do not watch.... Why we should promote senseless content ...


Aziz Ali embraces the advice of his coach Nana by treating the boxing ring as his ghar but Prabhu does not know that he is slowly harboring dreams of making his daughter Ananya, his gharwali. The movie packs a bit too many subplots, and because of that fails to hit the target of Mehra pictures like in Rang De Basanti and BMB. But the boxing paraphernalia, training, matches, costumes, street scenes, makeup, and cinematography are top-notch.


Since the plot was known it had to be laced with taut screenplay but the film was more like a rehash of the 80s tales. Romance was absent, humor was silly, technical values were not strong, dialogues were pale and generating the adrenalin rush required for an action packed treat was nil. The first half was routine and goes without an intensity and same with the second half. This turned out to be a dusty book in a neglected cupboard.


His redemption is forcing a choice on the world. An old out of weight boxer under a cloud should, seemingly, no longer have the choice to be a champion. And yet, he MAKES it happen, against all odds. That is an interesting movie. Acknowledging exactly how those odds are stacked against people, how insurmountable and unfair and horrible they are, but also saying that if you persevere, you can get passed them.


I came across this book sometime last year when I was trying to educate myself on the early days of Indian cinema. Since my interest in Indian cinema is in movies from 1950s and onwards, when it comes to the two preceding decades, barring certain iconic names such as K.L. Saigal, Pankaj Mullick, Devika Rani, Himanshu Rai, I know nothing more.


Since yesterday (April 22, 2018) was the 102nd birth anniversary of Kanan Devi and today is celebrated as World Book Day, it seems apt to commemorate these days (and yes keep the blog active) with a post about this book.


As a child, Kanan Bala was said to be quiet and much of a loner, lost in her own world of daydreams, triggered by books she had read and the melodies she heard (of Baul singers, local pooja pandals, jatra theatre.) She was attracted to music and would often get lost, drawn by music and would have to be brought back home. Calcutta, in those early years, was a happening place and attracted popular entertainers, be they circus artistes, jugglers, musicians, dancers and actors. There indeed was much to see and hear.


She was just ten when she met Tulsi Banerji, a character actor in theatre and nascent film industry. Even at that age, Kanan Devi is said to have possessed striking looks, one that got Banerji to notice her. It was Banerji who introduced Kanan to his contacts at Madan Theatres Limited. Her screen test was successful as the owner of Madan Theatre and the director spotted the budding diva in her and she was selected. Kanan Devi made her debut in the silent film Jaidev (1926). She earned a princely sum of Rs 5 per month




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