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BLUE CHAIR SALON Group

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Alexander White
Alexander White

Registrar Of Births And Deaths Brisbane [EXCLUSIVE]



By using births, deaths and marriage (BDM) records you can form a chain linking one generation of your family to the next and one branch of your family to another. You can use the BDM information you find to follow these links back through your family tree.




registrar of births and deaths brisbane


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Compulsory civil registration of births, deaths and marriages was introduced in Australia in the middle of the nineteenth century. This meant that people were required by law to register these events with government authorities. Despite this, events were sometimes not registered, particularly in remote and rural areas.


Each state and territory in Australia has a registry of births, deaths and marriages. You can apply to the registry for official copies of certificates via their websites. Unfortunately certificates are costly to purchase.


The registrars also provides telephone advice to clinicians during business hours on whether a death is reportable. These deaths represent the high volume, less complex range of matters reported to coroners. Refer to the Information for Health Professionals page for further information.


EXPLANATORY NOTES INTRODUCTION 1 This publication contains statistics for births and fertility in Australia. Detailed information can be obtained from data cubes (in Microsoft Excel format) available for download from the ABS website. 2 A glossary is provided detailing definitions of terminology used. Also provided is a list of abbreviations. SCOPE AND COVERAGE 3 The statistics in this publication relate to the number of births registered during the calendar years shown, unless otherwise stated. Scope of births statistics 4 The ABS Birth Registrations collection includes all births that occurred and were registered in Australia, including births to mothers whose place of usual residence is overseas. 5 The scope of the statistics includes:all births that are live born and have not been previously registered. A live birth is delivery of a child, irrespective of duration of pregnancy, who, after being born, breathes or shows any evidence of life such as heartbeat; births to temporary visitors to Australia (including visitors from Norfolk Island); births occurring within Australian Territorial waters; births occurring in transit (births on ships or planes) if registered in the state of 'next port of call'; births to Australian nationals employed overseas at Australian legations and consular offices (for example, children born overseas to Australian diplomats or their families); and births that occurred in earlier years that have not previously been registered (late registrations). 6 The scope of the statistics exclude:still births/fetal deaths (these are accounted for in perinatal death statistics published in Causes of Death, Australia, cat. no. 3303.0); adoptions, sex changes, legitimations and corrections; births to foreign diplomatic staff; and births occurring on Norfolk Island. 7 Up to and including the 2006 issue of Births, Australia (cat. no. 3301.0), the scope for each reference year of the Birth Registrations collection included:all births registered in Australia for the reference year and received by ABS in the reference year; births registered during the two years prior to the reference year but not received by ABS until the reference year; and births registered in the reference year and received by ABS in the first quarter of the subsequent year. 8 For example, birth records received by ABS during the March quarter 2007 which were initially registered in 2006 (but not fully completed until 2007) were assigned to the 2006 reference year. Any registrations relating to 2006 which were received by ABS after the end of the March quarter 2007 were assigned to the 2007 reference year. 9 Under these rules, it was possible for a birth registration to not be recorded in the collection. For 2007 onwards, the scope of the Birth Registrations collection has been reviewed and amended. The scope now includes:all births registered in Australia for the reference year and received by ABS in the reference year; births registered in the years prior to the reference year but not received by ABS until the reference year or the first quarter of the subsequent year, provided that these records have not been included in any statistics from earlier periods; and births registered in reference year and received by ABS in the first quarter of the subsequent year. Coverage of births statistics 10 Ideally, for compiling annual time series, the number of events (births) should be recorded as all those occurring within a given reference period such as a calendar year. Due to lags in registration of births and the provision of that information to ABS from state/territory Registrars of Births, Deaths and Marriages, data in this publication are presented on a year of registration basis. 11 In effect there are three dates attributable to each birth registration:the date of occurrence (of the birth); the date of registration or inclusion on the state/territory register; and the month in which the registered event is provided to the ABS. 12 Data in this publication are presented according to date of registration, unless otherwise stated. The registration date differs between states and territories, and should be taken into account when analysing birth statistics:for births registered in New South Wales, Victoria, Western Australia and the Australian Capital Territory, the birth registration date is the date at which the record is entered into the registration processing system; for births registered in South Australia, preliminary and final registration dates are allocated. Where a record requires further information a preliminary date is assigned. Once all data is finalised, a final registration date is assigned to the birth record which is provided to the ABS as the registration date; for births registered in Queensland, the registration date is the date at which all data on the birth record is finalised. This may be before the birth is entered into the registration system; for births registered in the Northern Territory, the registration date is the date at which the record is entered into the registration system. For birth records not received by the Registrar within 60 days of the birth, the Registrar will register the child as 'unnamed' and not finalised; and for births registered in Tasmania, a date is allocated when the birth record is entered into the registration system. The ABS receives an 'insertion' date which is the date when any information relating to the birth is entered into the registration system. CLASSIFICATIONS Nuptiality 13 Nuptiality relates to the registered marital status of the parent(s) of the child at the time of birth. Confinements and births are classified as:nuptial where the father registered was married to the mother at the time of the child's birth, or where the husband died during pregnancy. Confinements and births of Indigenous mothers considered to be tribally married are classified as nuptial; and exnuptial where the parents were not in a registered marriage at the time of the child's birth, irrespective of whether the parents were living together at the time of the birth. 14 Exnuptial births and confinements are further classified as paternity acknowledged (where the father signed the birth registration form) or paternity not acknowledged (where the father did not sign the form). Australian Standard Geographical Classification 15 The Australian Standard Geographical Classification (ASGC) is a hierarchical classification system consisting of six interrelated classification structures. The ASGC provides a common framework of statistical geography and thereby enables the production of statistics which are comparable and can be spatially integrated. 16 For further information refer to Australian Standard Geographical Classification (ASGC) (cat. no. 1216.0). Standard Australian Classification of Countries 17 The Standard Australian Classification of Countries (SACC) (Second Edition) groups neighbouring countries into progressively broader geographical areas on the basis of their similarity in terms of social, cultural, economic and political characteristics. The SACC (Second Edition) is the revised edition of the Australian Standard Classification of Countries for Social Statistics (ASCCSS) and includes concordances between the SACC (First Edition) and the SACC (Second Edition). 18 For further information refer to Standard Australian Classification of Countries (SACC) Second Edition (cat. no. 1269.0). DATA SOURCES 19 Registration of births is the responsibility of state and territory Registrars of Births, Deaths and Marriages and is based on data provided on an information form completed by the parent(s) of the child. This form is the basis of the data provided to the ABS, by the Registrars, for compilation into aggregate statistics in this publication. Most data items are collected in all states and territories and therefore statistics at the national level are available for most characteristics. Some states collect additional information. 20 Hospitals and birth clinics notify state and territory registries of recent births on a regular basis. For those births known to a registry that have not been registered within a prescribed time period, a reminder letter is sent to the parent(s) of the child to follow-up the birth registration. States and territories 21 As a result of an amendment made in 1992 to section 17(a) of the Acts Interpretation Act 1901-1973 (Cwlth) the Indian Ocean territories of Christmas Island and Cocos (Keeling) Islands have been included as part of geographic Australia, hence another category of the state and territory classification has been created. This category is known as 'Other Territories' and includes Christmas Island, the Cocos (Keeling) Islands and Jervis Bay Territory. 22 Prior to 1993 births to mothers usually resident in Christmas Island and Cocos (Keeling) Islands were included with Off-Shore Areas and Migratory in Western Australia, while births to mothers usually resident in Jervis Bay Territory were included with the Australian Capital Territory. In 2007 there were 21 births to mothers usually resident in Jervis Bay Territory, Christmas Island and the Cocos (Keeling) Islands. 23 Statistics for states and territories have been compiled and presented in respect of the state or territory of usual residence of the mother, except where otherwise stated. In the following table data are presented on a state or territory of registration basis. Births which took place outside Australia are excluded from the statistics. Births to mothers who were usual residents of Australia's Other Territories (Christmas Island, Cocos (Keeling) Islands and Jervis Bay Territory) are registered in other Australian states. BIRTHS, State or territory of usual residence of mother and state or territory of registration - 2007 STATE OR TERRITORY OF REGISTRATION State or territory of usual residence NSW Vic. Qld SA WA Tas. NT ACT Total New South Wales 86 847 1 103 544 29 33 np np 930 89 495 Victoria 76 70 095 49 55 23 12 np np 70 313 Queensland 825 76 60 301 12 23 6 np np 61 249 South Australia np 27 np 19 541 12 7 42 - 19 662 Western Australia 43 24 34 13 29 013 np 31 np 29 164 Tasmania 23 27 14 np np 6 584 - - 6 662 Northern Territory 26 19 46 28 16 np 3 757 np 3 894 Australian Capital Territory 76 9 np - np np - 4 663 4 753 Other Territories np - - np 18 - - - 21 Australia 87 937 71 380 61 004 19 686 29 147 6 623 3 837 5 599 285 213 - nil or rounded to zero (including null cells) np not available for publication but included in totals where applicable, unless otherwise indicated 24 In 2007 there were 456 births to women who usually lived overseas. These have been included in this publication with state or territory of usual residence classified according to the state or territory in which the birth was registered. Births, Babies born in Australia to non-resident mothers State or territory of registration 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 New South Wales 331 338 398 380 281 308 324 Victoria 19 22 24 20 23 21 17 Queensland 108 116 92 61 38 41 86 South Australia 8 4 5 9 - - 3 Western Australia 24 16 24 18 8 13 21 Tasmania 6 4 5 - 3 - - Northern Territory 8 6 5 3 5 4 np Australian Capital Territory 7 5 4 - 7 3 np Australia 511 511 557 491 364 391 456 - nil or rounded to zero (including null cells) np not available for publication but included in totals where applicable, unless otherwise indicated Sub-state/territory fertility rates 25 Age-specific and total fertility rates for sub-state/territory regions (for example, Statistical Divisions) presented in this publication are calculated as average rates over three years ending in the reference year. Rates for Australia and the states and territories in all other tables are based on single years of birth registration data. DATA QUALITY 26 In compiling births statistics, the ABS employs a variety of measures to improve the quality of the births collection. While every opportunity is undertaken to ensure that the highest quality of statistics are provided, the following is a list of known issues associated with the quality of births statistics included in this publication. Interval between occurrence and registration of births 27 For the most part, statistics in this publication refer to births registered during the calendar year shown. There is usually an interval between the occurrence and registration of a birth (referred to as a registration 'lag'), and as a result, some births occurring in one year are not registered until the following year or even later. This can be caused by either a delay by the parent(s) in submitting a completed form to the registry, or a delay by the registry in processing the birth. YEAR OF OCCURRENCE OF BIRTHS REGISTERED IN 2007 2001 and earlier 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 State or territory of registration % % % % % % % New South Wales 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.4 8.4 90.8 Victoria 0.6 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.9 9.8 88.0 Queensland 1.3 0.6 0.6 0.5 1.1 16.2 79.7 South Australia 0.9 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.3 7.9 90.4 Western Australia 1.0 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.6 8.3 89.0 Tasmania 2.5 - - - - 3.9 93.5 Northern Territory 0.2 - - - - 7.4 92.3 Australian Capital Territory 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.4 10.3 88.8 Australia 0.7 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.6 10.3 87.5 - nil or rounded to zero (including null cells) 28 Of the 285,200 births registered in 2007, 87.5% occurred in 2007, while 10.3% occurred in 2006 and the remainder (2.1%) occurred in 2005 or earlier years. Recent registration lags in Queensland 29 As a result of changes in the timeliness of registration of births in Queensland in the past two years, care should be taken when interpreting changes in Queensland births between 2005, 2006 and 2007. In the table below, 16.2% of the 61,000 births registered in Queensland in 2007 occurred in 2006. This proportion is higher than in previous years, indicating that the total number of births registered in Queensland in 2007 is to some extent due to changes in procedures for processing birth registrations by the Queensland Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages, as well as increases in the absolute number of registrations processed in 2007. Births registered in Queensland, Year of registration by year of birth Year of registration 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Year of birth % % % % % % 2001 and earlier 15.9 3.4 2.9 2.3 1.7 1.3 2002 84.1 11.3 1.2 0.6 0.7 0.6 2003 - 85.2 11.3 1.0 0.7 0.6 2004 - - 84.7 10.7 0.8 0.5 2005 - - - 85.4 14.8 1.1 2006 - - - - 81.3 16.2 2007 - - - - - 79.7 - nil or rounded to zero (including null cells) Indigenous births and fertility rates 30 The term Indigenous is used to refer to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. In the Birth Registrations collection, the Indigenous status of a birth is derived from the Indigenous status of the parent(s). 31 There are several data collection forms on which people are asked to state whether they are of Indigenous origin. Due to a number of factors, results collated from these forms are not always consistent. The way in which a person identifies, or is identified, as Indigenous on a specific form can change over time leading to unexpected changes in Indigenous statistics. Responses to Indigenous status questions can be influenced by a range of factors, including the perception of how information will be used, education programs about identifying as Indigenous, who completes the question on behalf of others, and emotional reaction to identifying as Indigenous. The data presented may therefore underestimate the level of Indigenous births and fertility in Australia. Lags in registrations may also affect reliability of measures of Indigenous fertility. Caution should be exercised when interpreting Indigenous births and fertility data presented in this publication, especially with regard to year-to-year changes. 32 Chapter 3 reports on the number and characteristics of Indigenous births and fertility in each state and territory, excluding Tasmania, the Australian Capital Territory and Other Territories, as the data are regarded as being of sufficient quality. Indigenous data for Tasmania have not been reported separately due to the unexplained decrease in Indigenous births registered in 2007, but are included in data cubes attached to this publication. Indigenous data for the Australian Capital Territory and Other Territories are not analysed separately due to small numbers but are included in totals for Australia. Numbers of Indigenous births for the Australian Capital Territory are published in data cube Table 1: Births, Summary, Australia, States and territories. 33 The populations used to calculate Indigenous fertility rates for 2006 are the 30 June 2006 experimental estimates of the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander female population aged 15-49 years, based on results of the 2006 Census of Population and Housing. For more information see Experimental Estimates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, Jun 2006 (cat. no. 3238.0.55.001). 34 The populations used to calculate Indigenous fertility rates for 2007 were derived by ageing the 30 June 2006 experimental estimates of Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander females aged 14-48 years by one year, and adjusting this data with the number of deaths of Indigenous females at each age that were registered in the year ending 30 June 2007. 35 The populations used to calculate Indigenous fertility rates for 1991 to 2005 are experimental estimates and projections of t


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